Retired United Airlines flight attendant Paul “Paulie” Veneto walked a beverage cart from Boston to Ground Zero in New York City to honor the flight attendants and completely totally different crew members killed on 9/11. 

At each flip, all by means of each state all by means of his bigger than 200-mile journey, Veneto acknowledged he could even see and listen to to individuals cheering him on.

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“People with signs, and flags and yelling my name. I never expected any of that,” Veneto urged Fox News. “But when it started to happen … and of course, that’s a nice feeling of motivation.” 

Retired United Airlines flight attendant , Paul "Paulie" Veneto pushing a beverage cart to Ground Zero. 

Retired United Airlines flight attendant , Paul “Paulie” Veneto pushing a beverage cart to Ground Zero. 
( Ian Stoker-Long, Courtesy of COMPEL)

His preliminary intention was to ensure that the world honored and remembered the women and men of Flight 175. They have been his colleagues, Veneto urged Fox News.

“I knew all those crew members on 175 … those guys were the first, first responders that morning and they had no choice but to stand up against some guys on that plane … to protect those passengers,” Veneto acknowledged. 

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This journey was for them. It was furthermore a technique for Veneto to remind the victims’ households their relations weren’t forgotten. 

“I am doing this because I want these crew members’ families to know how courageous they were that day,” Paulie’s Push website reads. “I want the public to understand that, under those conditions that morning, what those crew members did, nobody could have trained for. ” 

Retired United Airlines flight attendant , Paul "Paulie" Veneto pushing a beverage cart to Ground Zero. 

Retired United Airlines flight attendant , Paul “Paulie” Veneto pushing a beverage cart to Ground Zero. 
(Ian Stoker-Long, Courtesy of COMPEL)

However, Veneto rapidly found that he was impacting the lives of fairly just a few others who adopted him on his journey. 

During his time on the street, Veneto acknowledged, individuals would walk alongside him and share private tales about their lives, notably the struggles they confronted. 

“They just needed to tell me things and walk with me,” he acknowledged. 

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He had a GPS on the beverage cart so individuals may observe precisely what freeway he was on from Boston all one of the best ways throughout which to decrease Manhattan. 

At one stage, Veneto recalled a girl driving to his exact location contained in the rain so she may inform him the story of how her daughter donated a kidney to her. 

Retired United Airlines flight attendant , Paul "Paulie" Veneto pushing a beverage cart to Ground Zero. 

Retired United Airlines flight attendant , Paul “Paulie” Veneto pushing a beverage cart to Ground Zero. 
( Ian Stoker-Long, Courtesy of COMPEL)

“She walked for three miles … and just told me the whole story,” he recalled. 

No one, together with Veneto’s mates who adopted alongside him in a Jeep and RV, anticipated this to occur, Veneto acknowledged. 

“People would follow me from Massachusetts to Connecticut to meet up somewhere, all the way to New York. It was crazy,” he added. 

Retired United Airlines flight attendant , Paul "Paulie" Veneto at Ground Zero on Sept. 11, 2021. 

Retired United Airlines flight attendant , Paul “Paulie” Veneto at Ground Zero on Sept. 11, 2021. 
(Ian Stoker-Long, Courtesy of COMPEL)

Flight attendants that Veneto as rapidly as labored with and a great deal of of his relations joined him for the final phrase mile in Manhattan. 

It wasn’t a straightforward course of however for Veneto, nevertheless it absolutely definitely was one issue he felt “obligated to do.” 

“I mean, that’s my job as a fellow crew member … I need to recognize these guys for what they did,” Veneto acknowledged. 

He arrived at Ground Zero at 1:15 p.m. Sept. 11.

“I put my hands on the wall and I knelt down, and I just said to myself, ‘it’s done.'”